Lavinia Ellen "Vinnie" Ream ....

Discussion in 'Biographies of the Great and Common.' started by 5fish, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Words of A 17 year old girl who spent 30 minutes a day with President Linclon for 5 months...

    I think that history is particularly correct in writing Lincoln down as the man of sorrow. The one great, lasting, all-dominating impression that I have always carried of Lincoln has been that of unfathomable sorrow, and it was this that I tried to put into my statue.

    --Vinnie Ream


    Vinnie was making sculpture of Lincoln which gave her this access and time with Lincoln.

    This link gives A nice brief story about her time with Lincoln....

    http://mentalfloss.com/article/83640/teen-who-met-lincoln-30-minutes-every-day

    Here is a link her Farragut statue...

    http://www.streetsofwashington.com/2010/04/farragut-statue-vinnie-reams-other-big.html?m=1
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 9, 2019
  2. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Here is a link to a nice condense bio of her work... She was a well-connected lady...

    https://www.civilwarwomenblog.com/vinnie-ream/

    Here is how Mark Twain describes here Lincoln statue at the Capital building...

    Twain advises the tourist to pass up a chance to view Washington from the Capitol's new dome because to get there...

    ...you might have to pass through the old part of the building, and you could not help seeing Mr. Lincoln, as petrified by a young lady artist for $10,000 - and you might take his marble Emancipation Proclamation, which he holds out in his hand and contemplates, for a folded napkin; and you might conceive from his expression and his attitude, that he is finding fault with the washing. Which is not the case. Nobody knows what is the matter with him; but everybody feels for him.

    I must admit I was wrong there are books about Vinnie's life , just not on goggle books.... a link to a list .....

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/s/ref=is_s?k=vinnie+ream

     
  3. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    I just found s whole website to Ms. Ream life...

    https://www.vinnieream.com/index.htm


    Vinnie went to Rome and set up a studio like many other women sculptors and she kept a guestbook and guess who visited her, Ms. Edmonia Lewis and many others...

    Artists' studios in Rome and Florence during the nineteenth century were prime items on virtually every tourist's agenda, second only to the antiquities and public galleries. Virtually all of the guidebooks contain their addresses, and most of the travel memoirs published -- they are legion -- contain some mention of studio visits.6 Some have entire chapters devoted to major expatriate artists like Hiram Powers or Wilham Wetmore Story. What makes Vinnie's studio so interesting in this regard, however, is the fact that she kept a guest book from December 1869, until some time prior to her leaving Rome in October 1870. This guest book is the second major item of Vinnie's to be found at The University of Iowa.

    Tourists, diplomats, sculptors both Italian and American, painters, musicians, dignitaries from the Roman Catholic Church, and American politicians are all to be found registered in Vinnie's guest book. Not many of the signatures are autographs, since Vinnie or her parents evidently kept the book in order, although a notable exception to this is Franz Liszt, who signed the book with a flourish on April 10, 1870. According to her travel notes on the European journey, Vinnie first met Liszt when she went to hear him play at a convent in Rome on January 7, 1870.7 Thereafter he several times went to her studio for long visits. She made a medallion of his head and he dedicated a song to her.

    From the American artist colony in Rome, Harriet Hosmer, Chauncey B. Ives, Edmonia Lewis, Joseph Mozier, Willian H. Rinehart, Randolph Rogers, and William Wetmore Story, all prominent sculptors, are registered in Vinnie's guest book. Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Margaret Foley, and Sarah Freeman Clark -- less well-known women sculptors whom, along with Harriet Hosmer, Henry James called the "white Marmorean flock," all came. So did Charlotte Cushman, the famous American actress now near the end of her life. Among painters registered were George Healy and Miner K. Kellogg, the latter known mostly for an extended public argument over the exhibition of Hiram Powers' "Greek Slave" in the United States during the 1840's. An entry for February 1870, "Mrs. and Miss Cassatt," almost certainly register Mary Cassatt and her mother.

    There are also "old" friends from Washington, including John Rice, chairman of the House committee which originally recommended Vinnie for the Lincoln commission. Representative James S. Rollins is there, too -- he had written a long description of Vinnie's character in recommending her for something, possibly for the original settings that Lincoln granted her in 1864.8 Vinnie had known Rollins since her year in Christian College, shortly before she met Colonel Elias Boudinot, that Cherokee businessman who named Vinita, Oklahoma, for her. He, too, was in Rome at this time.


    Here is the link to the University of Iowa site and her time in Rome for they have Ms. Vinnie guestbook...

    http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/bai/mcdonald.htm

    Did you read there is a town in Oklahoma named after her...
     
  4. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Here her statue of Lincoln.... she has two more statues in the capital as well...

    [​IMG]
     
  5. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Here are the other two statues in the Capital building...

    [​IMG]

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    Here the story behind the Statues... read the link for the whole story

    Link: https://www.fold3.com/page/642818512-lavinia-ellen-ream-hoxie

    Snip...

    More than 40 years later, two bronze statues by Ream were placed in the Capitol. The first was the statue ofSamuel Jordan Kirkwood, donated in 1913 to the National Statuary Hall Collection by the state of Iowa. Ream spent summers in Iowa, and in 1906 she was commissioned to create a statue of Kirkwood, who was governor and U.S. Senator from that state. The second work, commissioned in 1912, is the statue of Sequoyah, the Native American recognized for inventing the written alphabet for the Cherokee language. Ream herself maintained throughout her life the friendships she made as a girl with Cherokees. Her statue shows Sequoyah holding in his left hand a tablet with his alphabet. After Ream's death in 1914, sculptor George Zolnay completed the statue; it was donated in 1917 to the National Statuary Hall Collection by the state of Oklahoma.
     
  6. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Here is an image of her as a teenager working out of the Whitehouse...

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