MattL's Civil War Ancestry

Discussion in 'Antebellum, Civil War and Reconstruction Genealogy' started by MattLul, Sep 14, 2019.

  1. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    So far I have discovered that 10 of my ancestors have served in the Civil War, split amongst both Union and CSA. I recently just did a proper pass to find records to confirm which units they served in and validate that everything matches up. One of them is still speculative, strong family stories (not passed down to me but those I discovered after running into relations while researching genealogy) match up to him dying in the Civil War (the only of my ancestors to have died during the war) and I believe I've found the correct records for him but still am looking to fully verify it.

    So my first step is this overview of them and then to keep digging further. It's a bit coincidental that it turned out I have 4 ancestors who served in the Union, 5 in the CSA, and one who served in both.

    Isom Paul Langley (Union and CSA) - was first in CSA as Isham P Langley - Pvt 33rd Arkansas Inf, Co E then was in Union as Isaac P Langley - Pvt 4th Arkansas Cavalry, Co H (2x great grandfather)

    Toliver Roberts (Union) - Pvt 72nd & 73rd Missouri Militia (4x great grandfather)

    Matthew Shipman (Union) - Pvt Greene County Reg Missouri H. G. (5x great grandfather)

    John Quincy Adams Mayhugh (Union) - Pvt 30th Illinois Inf, Co A (3x great grandfather)

    Isaac Newton Joseph (Union) - Pvt 31st Ohio Inf, Co A (4x great grandfather)

    William Bennett Everett (CSA) - Pvt 12th Arkansas Inf, Co D, then 6th (3x great grandfather)

    James Albert Andrews (CSA) - Pvt Phillips Legion Georgia, Co A (3x great grandfather)

    Thomas W. Peterson (CSA) - Pvt 6th Arkansas Inf, Co F (4x great grandfather)

    William C. Thomas (CSA) - Sgt 11th Georgia Inf, Co C, died while serving during 1864 (4x great grandfather)

    Elisha Francis May (CSA) - Pvt 2nd Alabama Cav, Co G (4x great grandfather)

    Ancestors who were involved with non-military pre, during, and post Civil War activities

    Hood S. Baker b. 1834 Jefferson County, Indiana - He was an early pioneer of Kansas and was around during a lot of the pre-civil war events (including Bleeding Kansas). He was present and observed (though not a participant) in the disbanding of the Topeka Legislature by Colonel Sumner.

    He was a very early town member in what is now a ghost town (and pretty much wiped off of existence actually) of Sumner in Atchison County, Kansas. He was a strong supporter of Kansas being a free state. There he was elected as a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention which was the most progressive of the Kansas constitution (even including some womens rights), though not fully adopted.


    Thomas K Jones b. 1858 in Arkansas and lived in Christian County Missouri. He was a member of a Missouri post Civil War vigilante gang (pro-Union) called the Baldknobbers. His group were the most extreme (the Christian County sect) of Bald Knobbers. They violently enforced "morale" codes of the time (sometimes going way too far). I found and got photocopies from the National Archives of his court records (35 pages of US vs. Thomas K Jones) where charges were brought against him for intimidation and threats (as well as threats for someone not to act as a witness lol). His brother was much more involved, Amos Jones, who was married to the daughter of the local Baldknobber leader David Walker, Amos and some others pleaded guilty to second degree murder and was imprisoned for many years, later his sentence was commuted after many local residents (including jurists on the original trial) asked for leniency since him and some others were just present during the event.
     
  2. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    That's a very good point, I hadn't noticed that range until I listed them out like that. I'm younger than you, but not particularly young, 32. Out of interest I mapped out my descents from the 2x and 5x lines with the age they were when my ancestor (child) was born listed to the right. Looks like one line everyone was in there 20s (mostly younger range of that) when they had my ancestors while the other line of mine everyone was in their 30s or 40s with each child born.

    My 5x great-grandfather line

    Matthew H Shipman (1811 - 1878) - 23
    Martha Shipman (1834 - 1916) - 21
    Nancy Ann Roberts (1865 - 1956)- 23
    Minnie Edna Maude Jones (1888 - 1978) - 27
    Willie Albert Pool (1915 - 1963) - 19
    Grandmother (1934 - ) - 23
    Mother - 26
    Myself - Matthew Allen Langley (1983) - 32


    My 2x great-grandfather line

    Isom Paul Langley (1828 - 1917) - 42
    John Anderson Langley (1870 - 1921) - 47
    John Glynn Langley (1917 - 1996) - 31
    Father (1948 - ) - 35
    Myself - Matthew Allen Langley (1983)
     
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  3. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    Lol, good catch... Well there might have been some time travel involvedQuite a feat. You were born in 1938 and your father was born in 1948.[​IMG]
     
  4. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    It definitely has caused me to look at the Civil War in a very complex and diverse light. I was born in the West (Phoenix, Arizona) hence my variety of places my ancestors hailed from, following them across the US map is definitely a case of each generation moving a bit further west. Most come from the South with a couple of lines coming from the North (but pre-Civil War).

    I am proud of all my ancestors who fought on both sides. Growing up in the West however I notice (mostly by observations on forums like this) that though the West has it's own bias (like anyone does), at least the environment I grew up in had much less invested in opinions of the Civil War's causes, motivations, flags, etc.

    The idea of people still arguing over the Civil War was completely foreign to me... for me learning about it in school (with good History teachers but still our education system needs much work) was like learning about the American Revolution, or World War I or II... all in the past with no real major debate or argument of symbolism of the Confederate flag (the idea that people actually still flew the flag was a surprise when I first observed it) or the idea of "Yanks" or the converse view of the North still holding a grudge against people of the South. I had views on some of that but no vested interest in defending or arguing it other than any other historical debate.

    It's definitely been eye opening watching those debates unfold on this forum and it makes sense. People who grew up in areas that have deep history involving events of the Civil War, either North or South, have a lot more vested in it than people of the West (with some exceptions I'm sure).

    Unfortunately I grew up with no information about my ancestors Civil War service passed down (and practically no history at all passed down). It's taken a lot of genealogical work to identify them and get any details about their service. Really wish I would've had more shared.
     
  5. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    I found my 10th Civil War Veteran ancestor. Elisha Francis Marion May, my 4th great grandfather. Of particular interest his maternal grandfather was a Jacob Busby from South Carolina. Paternal descendants of Jacob Busby tested for the most common Sub-Saharan African and African American haplogroup (the specific markers testing most commonly along the West African Coastal regions), all of that meaning the paternal ancestor was a slave exported from Africa.

    This broke my tie if I count Isom P Langley in both... breaking down to 5.5 who served in the CSA and 4.5 who served in the Union. Though if I count him where he ended up (considering he was drafted into the CSA) it re-establishes a tie of 5 who served in each.

    I also added entries for two of my ancestors who didn't serve but were involved in pre or post Civil War activities.

    Btw thanks for sharing info on the Sons of Union vets. If I were to consider joining a "Sons of" Civil War group I'd probably consider joining both (assuming there aren't rules preventing that).
     
  6. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    Isom Paul Langley was born in 1828 in Clark County, Arkansas. In 1851 he married Nancy Jane Bear in the same county.

    His father was Miles L Langley born 1800 in Orangeburg District, South Carolina. His mother was Sally Bulter born about 1800 in Jackson County, Georgia. Miles died in 1831 when his children were still under age. Sally remarried to the future father in law of Isom, Peter Bear in 1842. One year later Sally died and John Anderson a neighbor helped take care of Isom and his siblings. My ancestor, son of Isom, John Anderson Langley would be named after him.

    Isom was named after his grandfather and great grandfather, both named Isham (Isom and Isham are interchangeable). Isom died in 1917 at the age of 89. Both of them were in backcountry South Carolina in the mid 1700s to early 1800s, before coming to Arkansas. I have yet to find any record of Isham Sr being involved in the American Revolution in any way though he did own and reside on land on Cloud's Creek near where an infamous "Cloud's Creek Massacre" happened, where William "Bloody Bill" Cunnihgham, a Loyalist, massacred some rebel troops.

    Isham, the father of Miles, was likely married to a Jane Pearson a daughter of a John Pearson. John Pearson was likely a loyalist and he may be the same John Paerson on a list of loyalists murdered in 1782:
    http://sc_tories.tripod.com/list_of_murdered_loyalists.htm

    Sally Butler was the daughter of a George and Elizabeth Butler. George and Elizabeth would end up moving on from Arkansas to Texas and George would be elected senator from Teneha Dist to first two Texas Conventions at San Felipe de Austin in 1832. They would be present during the Republic of Texas years.

    A story has been passed down about Isom P:
    It is unclear if he ever worked as a nurse, but the rest of the story proves out in the evidence.

    There is an enlistment record for Isham P Langley in Arkansas, here is a roll where it lists he was away "sick at home Clark County Ark"

    Isom was born, lived in, and died in Clark County, Arkansas.

    [​IMG]


    Isom later enlisted as Isaac P Langley in the Union. He submitted a pension request later and was accepted. Here is a certificate of discharge from the Union and a pension document that lists his alias as Isaac P Langley

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    He served in the 4th cavalry of Arkansas from the 19 Nov 1863 until he was discharged in March 28 1864.

    A summary of the regiments service during his relatively brief time in service:
    http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unartr.htm#4thcav

    I have found two pictures of him (though not related to the war):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It was said that Isom and Nancy took in over 40 orphaned children. I've found court records for at least 4-5 children.


    Isom P. Langley came from a family that was very split by the war. He had two brothers who served in the Confederacy (and didn't sneak over to the Union side like him). One was promoted to a Lieutenant and was captured during the war, he spent 19 months as a prisoner of war. Another died while serving, the only record I found mentions a tree falling on him (of all ways to die during the war). Even more interesting though is another brother, a Miles Ledford Langley who was a preacher and exempt from service. He was an abolitionist and said he was beat, shot, and imprisoned for speaking for freedom of the slaves. After the war he became a delegate to the Arkansas State Constitutional Convention. There he was laughed off the stage for speaking for women's rights. Later he wrote a letter apologizing to Susan B Anthony for the lack of support by his state:


    Nothing has been passed down about how these brothers got along with such differing experiences in the war time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  7. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    As it turns out there were three John Pearsons in Newberry at the same time, no known relation between all of them. Mine doesn't connect to the Pearsons descended from Lawrence via paper trail, a possibly male descendant of mine has been Y DNA tested and is a different haplogroup as well. The web of Pearson families were a confusing mess lol and many old genealogy books got a lot of things wrong.
     
  8. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    Thought I'd share the full letter from Miles L Langley to Susan B Anthony, found it interesting. I've just placed an order for a research paper done on Miles in the 1970s in Arkansas, hoping to find some more interesting things. I also found some pretty great debate comments from him during the Arkansas Constitutional Convention post Civil War.

    ----
    SUSAN B. ANTHONY--_Dear Friend_: With a sad heart but an approving conscience, I will give you some information relative to the action of our constitutional convention on the franchise question.

    The new constitution--a copy of which I send you--makes no difference between men, on account of race or color and contains other excellences; but alas! it fails to guarantee to woman her God-given and well-earned rights of civil and political equality.

    I made a motion to insert in the constitution a section to read thus: "All citizens twenty-one years of age, who can read and write the English language, shall be eligible to the elective franchise, and be entitled to equal political and legal rights and privileges." The motion was seconded and I had the floor, but the House became so clamorous that the president could not restore order, and the meeting adjourned with the understanding that I was to occupy the floor next morning. But next morning, just as I was about to commence my speech, some of the members tried to "bully" me out of the right to speak on that question. I replied that I had been robbed, shot, and imprisoned for advocating the rights of the slaves, and that I would then and there speak in favor of the rights of women if I had to fight for the right!I then proceeded to present arguments of which I am not ashamed. I was met with ridicule, sarcasm and insult. My ablest opponent, a lawyer, acknowledged in his reply that he could not meet my argument. The motion was laid on the table.

    The Democrats are my enemies because I assisted in emancipating the slaves. The Republicans have now become my opponents, because I have made an effort to confer on the women their rights. And even the women themselves fail to sympathize with me.

    Very respectfully, MILES L. LANGLEY.

    ----
     
  9. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    William C Thomas was born around 1836/1837 in Forsyth County Georgia. He married Amanda Langston Nov 30, 1854 in Gilmer County, Georgia.

    His father was Jesse Thomas born 1802 in Georgia (unknown exactly where, possibly Franklin County). His mother was Rebecca Baker, they married around 1825 in Gwinnett County, Georgia. Unfortunately marriage records don't survive from this era, though another researcher made some great discoveries to support this marriage.

    I'm still researching Jesse Thomas to try and uncover his parentage. His mother is likely an Elizabeth Thomas that is on Gwinnett 1820 census before Jesse is married living next to the Bakers who he marries a daughter of. Unfortunately the trail goes cold there, with multiple Thomas lines surrounding that region of Georgia it's hard to place him. The most interesting things I've found about Jesse and family so far are

    1) In 1836 he was 1st Lieutenant in a Forsyth Militia during the "Indian Wars" era
    2) In 1850 Auraria in Lumpkin County Georgia as a Gold miner in a gold mining town now gone
    3) I seem to have found a newspaper article where Governor John Forsyth puts out a $100 bounty on Jesse and Eli B Thomas to stand trial for the alleged attempted murder of a John Hewitt in 1828. In 1831 Rebecca's father Chrisopher Baker's estate, administered by William and Samuel Baker brothers of Rebecca, is awarded a slave as a lien on a fi fa from Joh Hewitt. So seems like some sort of back and forth going on there.
     
  10. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    Unfortunately since I don't know Jesse Thomas's parentage I know nothing of Williams roots up that line. Having recently discovered Rebecca's parentage I know some of that line though am still researching it.

    Her parents were Christopher Baker married to Agnes Forrester. I know Christopher Baker served in the American revolution in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment.

    On further research it seems the John Hewitt that Jesse and Eli B Thomas were accused of attempting to murder was married to another daughter of Christopher and Agnes Baker. So seems like the in-laws had some issues.

    Finding information about William C Thomas has been challenging. Though it's not the first piece of evidence I found about them it makes sense to start with a family tree notes sheet I got from a wife of a cousin at the same generation as my grandfather, she took the notes from her mother-in-law making it even one generation further back. This is the furthest back family lore/info I've gotten on this line of my ancestry, one of the only ones. It's about my Bryant ancestry which leads up to William C Thomas.

    I descend from an Elias Bryant who married Nancy Manassas Thomas daughter of William C Thomas and Amanda Langston

    Bryant Genealogy.jpg

    It gets a lot of things wrong. It has Elias Bryant father as a John Gilbert Bryant Sr. Someone who never existed, his father was John Pinkney Bryant Sr. They also place his wife as a Martha Langston when it as actually a Virginia Cooper. Nancy's parents are listed as a Amanda & John Thomas. When it was William C Thomas and Amanda Langston.

    Mostly mixing up names and people though some of the general details are right. It makes sense now that I know the full story, both Elias and Nancy were orphaned young and never knew there parents well (or at all). In Elias Bryant's death certificate filled out by his son (not my ancestor) it lists his father as George Bryant and mother Unknown. That was wrong as well. It seems like little of family info was passed down.

    The most interesting part is here, a little story about Nancy's father.

    Nancy M Thomas.png

    Where it says

    ----
    Manassas Thomas
    was left an orphan at 7 days old
    Her father killed in Civil War in the battle of Manassas.
    She was named for the battle.
    After her mother died
    the children were found hiding in the leaves.

    ----

    Most of that matches up. In the 1860 census I see William, Amanda, and children (two sons and one daughter) minus Nancy who was born Jan 1862 (living next to Amanda's parents John and Clarissa Langston). In the 1870 census William and Amanda are gone and their children are split up between relatives. Nancy and her sister are living with their grandmother Clarissa Langston (John their grandfather is dead by then), one son is living with William's mother Rebecca. Another son is living with William's sister a Mary Thomas who married a James Echols.

    So I searched military records for William C Thomas. In 1860 he and his family were residing next to his in-laws (likely on their land actually) in Gilmer, Dawson County, Georgia. Dawson was formed partially from Gilmer in 1857 and there's a marriage certificate for a William C Thomas marrying Amanda Langston in 1854 in Gilmer County, Georgia (I assume Gilmer, Dawson County represents the portion formed from Gilmer County).

    So I looked for him in either Dawson or Gilmer County. His Langston brother-in-laws enlisted in Dawson. No William Thomas that fits. I also don't find a William Thomas from Georgia that died at the Battle of Manassas, so I suspect that part of the story isn't quite right. Nancy does show up in her marriage records and some other records as "Nancy M Thomas"... additionally her sister had multiple descendants who passed down a middle name of Manassas, so the middle name is likely correct. Though I suspect she was named for the symbolism of Manassas to Confederates.

    I looked through all the William Thomas records, William C Thomas, W C Thomas, etc... I do find one that is both unaccounted for, doesn't fit any other William, and matches up nicely for him.

    https://www.fold3.com/image/20/78629409/

    W C Thomas.jpg

    A William C Thomas (sometimes listed as W C Thomas) who enlisted July 3, 1861 in Company C of the 11th Regiment Georgia Infantry.

    It says he was 27 years old, I'm assuming this is from enlistment date, though the bounty roll referenced is not dated. That would place his birth year around 1834, mine was born 1836-37 so not perfect but pretty close. The census could be off by a couple years or the enlistment records.

    It says he was born in Lumpkin County, Georgia, though my William C. was born likely in Forsyth County, Georgia. Though Forsyth bordered Lumpkin at that time and his family moved around that area a lot as those counties were first formed. Additionally his family was living in Lumpkin County by 1850 so he probably spent a lot of his childhood there that he remembered.

    Company C was formed out of Murray County, Georgia. Though William wasn't living there in 1860 his parents Jesse and Rebecca were (and possibly where he was living there before marrying Amanda), as it turns out his family was in Murray County, Georgia in 1840 as well. Looking in Murray Co., GA in 1860 there's only one William that could fit age wise, though he was born in Tennessee.

    Additionally there is no pension record for William Thomas, or widow's pension, this fits with my William whose wife predeceased him.

    After all this search I'm pretty confident this is the right service record. It's the record that fits best for my William C and my William C is really the only fit I've found for this service record.

    Following that record he enlisted July 3rd of 1861 as a Private and the last muster roll recorded is March and April 1864 where he is listed as a 4th Sergeant. There is no death recorded or anything seemingly recorded about what happened to him. This left me puzzled for the last couple years though I assumed he died. Recently I solved this mystery with the help of another. They found this newspaper article for the casualty listing for the 11th Georgia published in June in 1864

    W C Thomas Death 11th Georgia.png

    For Company C it lists "Killed - Sergt W C Thomas"

    In looking at fold 3 for the casualties of the 11th Regiment for the 1864 Virginia campaigns I can find Company C's records here on page 7
    https://www.fold3.com/image/249/276353865

    Though the page is very faded and torn, it seems likely he was entered in that place that was torn and other than newspaper references to casualty lists (something I've seen some books mention they couldn't find) his death record was lost.

    At the bottom of the casualty list it reads:

    "The majority of these casualties were sustained June 1st, in driving the enemy's skirmishers and sharpshooters from their position behind the timer(?), while our line was exposed to a gatling (?) fir as it advanced across an open plain."

    Which would place his death at the Battle of Cold Harbor. In some quick searches I do find that Tige's Brigade was involved in efforts on the 1st.

    It seems William C Thomas served quite a while and through a lot of key battles. The 11th was originally commanded by George T. Anderson ("Tige") until he was promoted to command the brigade. Much of the war they served under Longstreet under Lee.

    They missed First Manassas by 1 day though. Looking at the list of battles for the 11th Georgia from 1861 to June of 1864 it includes him surviving Sharpsburg/Antietam and Gettysburg. It seems the 11th Georgia had 65% causalities on a single day of Gettysburg.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  11. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    William C Thomas in the 11th regiment saw a long history of some of the most significant battles. The battles I've found so far:

    • Missed - First Battle of Manassas/Bull Run (missed by one day due to delays) - July 21, 1861
    • Seven Days Battles - June 25 - July 1, 1862
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG John B Magruder's Command
      • BG David R. Jones' First Division
      • Col George "Tige" Anderon's Third (Jones') Brigade
      • Ltc William Luffman's 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Pvt William C Thomas
    • Second Battle of Manassas/Bull Run - August 28–30, 1862
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG James Longtreet's Command
      • BG David R. Jones' Division
      • Col George "Tige" Anderon's (Jones') Brigade
      • Ltc William Luffman's 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Pvt William C Thomas
    • Battle of Antietam/Sharpsburg - September 17, 1862
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG James Longtreet's Right Wing Command
      • BG David R. Jones' Division
      • Col George "Tige" Anderon's (Jones') Brigade
      • Maj Francis H. Little's 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Pvt William C Thomas
    • Battle of Fredericksburg - December 11–15, 1862
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG James Longtreet's First Corps
      • MG John Bell Hood's Division
      • BG George "Tige" Anderon's Brigade
      • Col Francis H. Little's 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Corpl William C Thomas
    • Battle of Gettysburg - July 1–3, 1863
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG James Longtreet's First Corps
      • MG John Bell Hood's Division (was wounded, passed command to Evander M. Law)
      • BG George "Tige" Anderon's Brigade (was wounded passed command to Ltc William Luffman)
      • Col Francis H. Little's 11th Georgia Infantry (was wounded passed command to Ltc William Luffman, then to Maj Henry D. McDaniel when he stepped up to command the brigade)
      • Corpl or Sergeant William C Thomas
    • Knoxville Campaign - November 16, 29, December 14
      • Army of Tennessee - Gen Braxton Bragg
      • LTG James Longtreet's First Corps
      • BG Micah Jenkins, Hood's Division
      • BG George "Tige" Anderon's Brigade
      • Col Francis H. Little's 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Corpl or Sergeant William C Thomas
    • Battle of the Wilderness - May 5–7, 1864
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • LTG James Longtreet's First Corps (wounded then MG Charles W. Field, MG Richard H. Anderson)
      • MG Charles W. Field's Division
      • BG George "Tige" Anderon's Brigade
      • 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Sergeant William C Thomas
    • Battle of Spotsylvania Court House - on and off from May 8 through May 21
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG Richard H. Anderson First Corps
      • MG Charles W. Field's Division
      • BG George "Tige" Anderon's Brigade
      • 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Sergeant William C Thomas
    • Battle of Cold Harbor - May 31 - June 12, 1864
      • Army of Northern Virginia - Gen Robert E Lee
      • MG Richard H. Anderson First Corps
      • MG Charles W. Field's Division
      • BG George "Tige" Anderon's Brigade
      • 11th Georgia Infantry
      • Sergeant William C Thomas, likely killed the 1st of June, 1864
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  12. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    Elisha Francis Marion May born 1835 in Talladega County, Alabama and died 1912 in Coleman County, Texas. In 1856 her married Louisa Tipton Berry in Coosa County, Alabama. His parents were Claiborne May and Jane "Jincy" Busby, both born in South Carolina.

    In the 1860 census he is listed as a School Teacher. His overly long middle names will not surprise anyone that his parents were from South Carolina. Francis Marion was an American Revolution war hero in South Carolina nicknamed the "Swamp Fox." His grandfather was a Jacob Busby born about 1762 and resided in the Orangeburg area of South Carolina and died in 1839 in St. Clair County, Alabama. He served in the American Revolution under Francis Marion. He submitted a detailed pension record that survives giving a lot of great detail about his service.

    He enlisted in the Confederate Army as a Private on March 26, 1862 in the 2nd Alabama Cavalry Company G.

    E F May CSA Service 2.jpg

    Various muster records survive and he seems to have served until the end of the war where he sought a parole on May 18th 1865.

    [​IMG]

    In 1870 it shows he returned to teaching after the war, by 1880 he was listed as a farmer. In his death certificate it listed his profession as a Preacher, he died at the age of 77.

    He seems to have served in the 2nd Alabama Cavalry Company G from March 1862 - until the end of the War and paroled May 1865. He served a total of over three years, making him the longest serving ancestor I have.

    A history of the 2nd Alabama

    http://www.americancivilwar101.com/units/csa-al/al-cav-02-reg.html
    ----
    The Second Alabama cavalry was organized at Montgomery in May, 1862; was in north Alabama for a short time and was then sent to Florida, where it was employed for a time; sent to Jackson, Miss., in April, 1863, and fought Grierson; was employed in Mississippi until October of that year, when it was sent to northern Alabama and Tennessee. It was in Chalmers' brigade continuously after August, 1863. In General Wheeler's cavalry corps, this regiment did arduous duty in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, losing heavily in the battle of July 22d before Atlanta. It skirmished in Sherman's rear, fighting almost daily, and followed him to Greensboro, N.C.; it formed part of the escort of President Davis to Georgia, where it surrendered at Forsyth, 450 strong.

    It was commanded for a short time by Col. J. S. Prather, succeeded by Capt. R. G. Earle, who, after his promotion, was killed at Kingston, Ga. It was successively commanded by Lieut.-Cols. J. P. West and J. N. Carpenter, both of whom had risen from the rank of captain. Capt. Wm. L. Allen died in the service. Capt. J. W. Whisenant was wounded at Kenesaw, Capt. James A. Andrews at Nickajack, Capt. Wm. P. Ashley at Decatur, Ga.

    ----

    http://www.archives.alabama.gov/referenc/alamilor/2ndcav.html
    ----
    This regiment was orgnaized at Montgomery, May 1, 1862. Proceeding to west Florida, it operated there about ten months, and was engaged in several skirmishes. Ordered to north Mississippi, and placed under Gen. Ruggles, the regiment lost 8 men in a skirmish at Mud creek. It was then placed in Ferguson's brigade, and operated in the Tennessee valley, taking part in numerous skirmishes. The Second fought Grierson at Okalona, with a loss of about 70 men killed and wounded, then harassed Sherman on his march to and from Mississippi. Joining Gen.Wheeler, the Second performed arduous duty on the flank of the army in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, and lost a number of men in the battle of July 22 at Atlanta. Having accompanied Hood to Rome, the Second then fell on Sherman's rear, and skirmished almost daily with some loss. The regiment tracked Sherman to Greenesboro, N. C., then escorted President Davis to Georgia. At Forsyth, in that State, the regiment laid down its arms, 450 strong.
    ----

    http://www.history-sites.com/cgi-bin/bbs62x/alcwmb/arch_config.pl?md=read;id=20735

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    This is an interesting command, possibly the only one in Confederate service to lose its colonel and major due to a dispute over a card game. I have a four-page organization table for this regiment, covering service record data for all field and staff officers, as well as company captains. I also wrote a paper concerning retired Lt. Col. John P. West. He left the regiment to protect his family in Shelby County from what today's newswriters would style 'insurgents'.

    We really don't know how many officers and men were with the command at the end because the regiments of Ferguson's brigade disbanded rather than formally surrender. There are few very paroles on record for this regiment; none for those actually with the command when it disbanded. SInce the brigade was part of Jefferson's Davis' escort from Charlotte NC to Georgia, you may be interested in reading William C. Davis' recent book, A Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government.

    To pick up as much as possible on the operations and activities of this regiment, you'll need to look for O. R. references to Brig. Gen. Samuel Wragg Ferguson and his cavalry command.

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    From the wiki

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    The 2nd Alabama Cavalry was organized at Montgomery, May 1, 1862. Proceeding to west Florida, it operated there about ten months, and was engaged in several skirmishes. Ordered to north Mississippi, and placed under Gen. Ruggles, the regiment lost 8 men in a skirmish at Mud creek. It was then placed in Ferguson's brigade, and operated in the Tennessee valley, taking part in numerous skirmishes. The Second fought Grierson at Okalona, with a loss of about 70 men killed and wounded, then harassed Sherman on his march to and from Mississippi. Joining Gen.Wheeler, the Second performed arduous duty on the flank of the army in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, and lost a number of men in the battle of July 22 at Atlanta. Having accompanied Hood to Rome, the Second then fell on Sherman's rear, and skirmished almost daily with some loss. The regiment tracked Sherman to Greenesboro, N. C., then escorted President Davis to Georgia.

    The regiment surrendered at Forsyth, Georgia. At the end, the regiment mustered about 450 men.

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    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  13. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    I have yet to fully dig into his regiments record, which I'll do, though of note is

    Having accompanied Hood to Rome, the Second then fell on Sherman's rear, and skirmished almost daily with some loss. The regiment tracked Sherman to Greenesboro, N. C., then escorted President Davis to Georgia.

    Being in a cavalry regiment it seemed he was some of the limited number that could trail Sherman's March and skirmish with them.
     
  14. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    Another thing of note for Elisha F M May is that his grandfather, the Jacob Buzby who served in the American Revolution in South Carolina (my 6th Great Grandfather) was paternally of SSA (Sub-Saharan African) descent.

    Multiple male descended cousins of Jacob Busby and other Busby's living in the same general region of South Carolina have been Y DNA tested. They all match each other fairly closely, confirming the Busby's are related and even more despite all being White they came up with the most common SSA Y DNA Haplogroup E-M2. It is also the most common haplogroup among African Americans. More specifically the branch of E-M2 is U175 -> U209, from wikipedia

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    This subclade has very high frequencies of over fifty percentages in Cameroonian populations of Bassa and Bakaka, possibly indicating place of origin. However, E-U209 is widely found at lower frequencies in West and Central African countries surrounding Cameroon and Gabon.[6] Brucato et al. (2010) found the SNP in a populations of Ahizi (in Ivory Coast) 38.8% (19/49), Yacouba (Ivory Coast) 27.5% (11/40), and Beninese 6.5% (5/77) respectively.[54]
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    What this means is that Jacob Buzby's paternal ancestor was an African exported as a slave.

    This also mean's that Elisha May who fought 3 years for the Confederacy, until after the surrender at Appomattox, was descended from an African American slave. Jacob Buzby passed for White and his father (the furthest known ancestor up that line) a John Busby passed for white as well, so it's possible he never even knew.

    Of interest once this was realized researches did indeed find various ties that make a lot of sense. There were other South Carolina Busbys in a different district who were free people of color. No known evidence to connect the two, though considering the DNA proving African paternal descent it seems likely they were indeed related, with my line of Busbys happening to intermix with more "White" people and so passing for White.

    Interestingly John Busby (father of Jacob) is recorded on a petition around 1773 in South Carolina where he's testifying that two male Busbys (seemingly his nephews) were indeed White.

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    Personally appeared John Buzby and Declared on his Oathe and saith that he knows Simon Buzby & Miles Buzby from Children that they were allways counted White People also knowed Their Grand Mother named Tabethy...she being a white woman & always counted by her Neighbors as such & further This Deponent sayeth not.
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    Obviously if you have to get multiple people witness that you were indeed "White" you probably weren't lol.

    This leads to a variety of connections between families and locations heavily including mixed and possibly tri-racial people. In fact it leads back to the proximity of many of the progenitors of the Lumbee and Mulengeon (so they might be distant cousins).

    One of the candidates for an ancestor of these Busby's is a Thomas Busby "Indyan boy" servant listed in the household of a Robert Caufield in Surry County, Virginia in 1684. Probably named for a Thomas Busby who resided on the same creek (and interacted with the same people) who was an English immigrant and royal Indian interpreter who sold Indian slaves.
     
  15. MattLul

    MattLul New Member

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    The Baldknobbers were interesting. My ancestor was Thomas K Jones, was surprised to find a "US vs. Thomas K Jones" file lol.

    Schwallanscher said:
    I've wondered if that was the case. I know that in some of the more intense battles just the basic rifle fire could tear down trees as well.found this threat just now. when i read reb's post i immediately thought 'if at all he'll join them both and put some fire under their respective cauldrons'

    you also made me look up baldknobbers (never heard of them)[​IMG]found this threat just now. when i read reb's post i immediately thought 'if at all he'll join them both and put some fire under their respective cauldrons'

    you also made me look up baldknobbers (never heard of them)[​IMG]that tree could have been 'made to fall' on him by an enemy canonball, though[​IMG]
     
  16. MattL

    MattL Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for bringing this thread of mine over. I plan to continue digging into the individual service history of my ancestors I have yet to cover, as well as try and understand and share the battle and regiment history of the ones I've already covered.
     
    jgoodguy likes this.

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