November 30 In Civil War History

Discussion in 'On This Day' started by Jim Klag, Nov 30, 2019.

  1. Jim Klag

    Jim Klag Ike the moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    On this day in Civil War history
    Compiled by Mitchell Werksman and Jim Klag
    November 30, 1810 - Oliver Winchester, American politician and firearms maker (Winchester Repeating Arms Company), born in Boston, Massachusetts (d. 1880)
    November 30, 1821 - Gustavus Woodson Smith, Confederate General and Secretary of War, born in Georgetown, KY. (d. 1896)
    November 30, 1826 - George Washington Deitzler, American Brigadier General (Union Army), born in Pine Grove, Pennsylvania (d. 1884)
    November 30, 1828 - Jedediah Hotchkiss, Engineer, mapmaker for Stonewall Jackson, born New York, NY. (d. 1899)
    November 30, 1835 - Mark Twain [Samuel Clemens], American author (Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn), born in Florida, Missouri (d. 1910)
    November 20, 1861 - Skirmish at Grand River, or Black Walnut Creek, near Sedalia, MO.
    November 30, 1861 - Skirmish near the mouth of Little Cacapon River, WV, where bushwhackers capture some of Brig. Gen. Benjamin F. Kelly's, USA, horses.
    November 30, 1862 - The federal warship, Vanderbilt, fails to capture the CSS Alabama, but instead the CSS Alabama captures and burns the vessel, Parker Cook, near the Leeward Islands, Atlantic Ocean.
    November 30, 1862 - Skirmish at Chulahoma, MS.
    November 30, 1862 - Skirmish on the Tallahatchie River, MS, with the destruction of the steamer, New Moon.
    November 30, 1862 - Federal expedition from Rolla to the Ozark Mountains, MO, and skirmishes. (Nov 30-Dec 6)
    November 30, 1863 - President Davis accepts Braxton Bragg's resignation and appoints William Hardee in temporary command of the Army of Tennessee.
    November 30, 1863 - Confederate troops vacate Fort Esperanza, Texas
    November 30, 1863 - G. K. Warren [US] decides not to attack the reinforced Rebel line near Mine Run, Virginia.
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmish at Salyersville, KY.
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmish near Port Hudson, LA.
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmish at Vermillion Bayou, LA, with Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, USA.
    November 30, 1863 - Affair at Charleston, TN, the Knoxville, TN, Campaign.
    November 30, 1863 - Federal scouts to New Madrid Bend, TN, to conscript all able-bodied men subject to military duty. During the night, the Confederates conscripted quite a few men from the same area. Both sides seizing horses, saddles, corn, etc. (Nov 30-Dec 3)
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmish at Yankeetown, TN, where the Federals drive the Confederates across the river, the commanding Federal claiming he would take no prisoners.
    November 30, 1863 - Federal occupation of Fort Esperanza, Matagorda Bay, TX.
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmish at Licking Run Bridge, the Mine Run Campaign, VA.
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmishes along Mine Run, VA.
    November 30, 1863 - Skirmish near Raccoon Ford, VA, the Mine Run Campaign.
    November 30, 1864 - The siege of Petersburg is ongoing.
    November 30, 1864 - Benjamin Jefferson Hill, CSA, is appointed Brig. Gen.
    November 30, 1864 - George Lafayette Beal, USA, is appointed Brig. Gen.
    November 30, 1864 - Henry Goddard Thomas, USA, is appointed Brig. Gen.
    November 30, 1864 - Skirmish near Dalton, GA.
    November 30, 1864 - Skirmish at Louisville, GA, with Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, USA.
    November 30, 1864 - The engagement at Honey Hill, near Grahamville, SC, as the Union expeditionary force from Hilton Head, under Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, USA, commanding the Dept. of the South, and his subordinate, Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, USA, are repulsed by an inferior Southern force, but with a strong defensive position; the Yankees report 746 casualties.
    November 30, 1864 - The Battle of Franklin, TN, where Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield, USA, repulses repeated Confederate attacks under Lieut. Gen. John Bell Hood, CSA, with very severe fighting near the Gin House, the Carter House, and along the Columbia and Lewisburg Pikes. Schofield withdrawing across the Tennessee River, toward Nashville, TN. Hood continues to pursue Schofield. Total casualties approximate 8,575.
    November 30, 1864 - Brig. Gen. John Adams, CSA, is mortally at the Battle of Franklin, TN, as he charged the Federal breastworks on his horse.
    November 30, 1864 - Maj. Gen. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne, CSA, is mortally wounded at the Battle of Franklin, TN, as he was leading his troops against the Federals.
    November 30, 1864 - Brig. Gen. States Rights Gist, CSA, is mortally wounded at the Battle of Franklin, TN, killed instantly as he led his troops in a frontal assault on the Federal breastworks.
    November 30, 1864 - Brig. Gen. Hiram Bronson Granbury, CSA, is mortally wounded at the Battle of Franklin, TN, as he led his troops in a frontal assault on the Federal breastworks.
    November 30, 1864 - Brig. Gen. Otho French Strahl, CSA, is mortally wounded at the Battle of Franklin, TN, as he handed rifles up to his men so they could fire down in the Federal works.
    November 30, 1864 - Brig. Gen. John Carpenter Carter, CSA, is mortally wounded at the Battle of Franklin, TN, as he led his men in a frontal assault on the Federal breastworks.
    November 30, 1864 - Skirmish at Thompson's Station, TN.
    November 30, 1864 - Skirmish at Snicker's Gap, VA.
    November 30, 1864 - Skirmish at Kabletown, WV.
    November 30, 1894 - Joseph E. Brown, American attorney and politician (42nd Governor of Georgia), dies at 73 in Atlanta, GA.
     
  2. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    An Indiana colonel who witnessed his death later wrote:

    General Adams rode up to our works and, cheering his men, made an attempt to leap his horse over them. The horse fell upon the top of the embankment and the general was caught under him, pierced with [nine] bullets. As soon as the charge was repulsed, our men sprang over the works and lifted the horse, while others dragged the general from under him. He was perfectly conscious and knew his fate. He asked for water, as all dying men do in battle as the life-blood drips from the body. One of my men gave him a canteen of water, while another brought an armful of cotton from an old gin near by and made him a pillow. The general gallantly thanked them, and in answer to our expressions of sorrow at his sad fate, he said, 'It is the fate of a soldier to die for his country,' and expired. — Confederate Veteran, June 1897.

    How did he die:

    Gist was shot in the chest while leading his brigade in a charge against U.S. fortifications at the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864.[1] He was leading the brigade on foot after his horse had been shot.[1] Two sources state that he died of his wounds soon after at a field hospital in Franklin, Tennessee but two others state that he was killed instantly on the battlefield.[2][7][10] He was one of twelve Confederate generals who were casualties that day, six of them killed in action.[11]

    Years later they corrected the spelling of his name:

    The correct spelling of the general's name has long been debated. He attended Oakland College under the name Granberry, but after graduating and moving to Texas he changed the spelling to Granbury. Why he changed the spelling of his name is unknown. His sister, Mrs. Nautie Granberry Moss, stated that he changed the spelling of his name based on a peculiar whim. The official records and correspondence of the Civil War show his named spelled as Granbury, although many Texas newspaper articles at the time referred to him as General Granberry. When he was killed at the battle of Franklin and buried in Tennessee, the name on his tombstone was spelled Granberry, perhaps because that was the spelling of the family name in the area. When he was exhumed and reburied in Granbury in 1893, the name on the tombstone was spelled Granberry. Apparently, however, the reburial opened a debate on the proper spelling of his namesake city, and a letter by one J. N. Doyle in the Dallas Morning News reviewed the history of the general’s name and concluded by pointing out that deeds for lots in the city, veterans who had served with him, and local citizens all used the spelling Granbury. In 1913, when a statue was erected on the Hood County courthouse square, the name was spelled Granbury. In 1996 a new tombstone with the name spelled Granbury was put in place, and after almost 150 years, the spelling of the general’s name on his tombstone, statue, and name city became uniform as Granbury

    November 30: Strahl reloaded his soldiers weapons for over two hours before he was killed at the Battle of Franklin. His body was later moved to the back porch at Carnton. He was buried at St. John’s Episcopal Church south of Columbia, TN for nearly 30 years. His body was exhumed, and his final resting place is the Dyersburg City Cemetery in Dyer County, TN.

    On November 30, 1864, at the Battle of Franklin, Strahl was leading his men on foot. Getting shot in the neck, he was struck and killed by another two bullets to the head. His body was taken to the back porch of the local Carnton plantation house, where he lay until he was buried near the battlefield.


    He lasted a few days...

    Carter was promoted to brigadier general to rank from July 7, 1864. He temporarily commanded a division at the Battle of Jonesboro. Brigadier General John C. Carter was mortally wounded during the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864 and died December 10 in the Harrison home, 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the battlefield.

    He temporarily commanded a division at the Battle of Jonesboro. Brigadier General John C. Carter was mortally wounded during the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864 and died December 10 in the Harrison home, 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the battlefield.[1]
     

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