The North’s Role in Confederate Monuments...

Discussion in 'Lost Cause discussion' started by 5fish, Sep 23, 2019.

  1. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    You "Lost Causer", Neo Confederates, and Confederate monument lovers, I have sad news for you. The majority of the confederate monument were made in Northern work shops and shipped south to be displayed. Yes, Yankees made your monuments...

    Snip... a summary of the article ... https://hyperallergic.com/384776/the-norths-role-in-supplying-the-south-with-confederate-monuments/

    Even so, Confederate monuments would not exist in such large numbers without mass production, which, in the wake of the Civil War, was far more possible in the North rather than in the South.

    Perhaps it is their ubiquity that has allowed Confederate monuments to stand for so long (by one count, about 1,500 in 31 states)

    On both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, the decades following the Civil War marked a shift in public memorialization in the United States, away from only commemorating famous individuals. There was a new impetus to honor the anonymous soldier, and a felt necessity for a place to mourn when the grave-sites of loved ones were unknown or located too far away to easily reach in person. This shift birthed an entire industry of memorial-making companies, as documented in Kirk Savage’s book Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves.

    At first though, the demand for memorials was often filled by already established Northern companies who made gravestones.


    The majority of the Confederate monuments created by companies in the North are local monuments that stand in cemeteries and town squares throughout the South. They often depict an anonymous soldier standing in “parade rest,” a pose struck by soldiers during ceremonies, as art historian Sarah Beetham has written.

    But a comparison of these figures to the samples depicted in catalogues published by the companies producing them, as well as the diligent work of historians, reveals their provenance.


    One of the most prominent Northern companies producing memorials for the South was the Monumental Bronze Company of Connecticut.

    Traditional bronze foundries were predominantly located in the North, and likewise produced figures of Confederate soldiers.


    The article list some southern monuments made in the north is your town one...
     
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  2. jgoodguy

    jgoodguy Webmaster Staff Member Administrator

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    From the article.
    The zinc casting process consisted of casting the figure in parts, which were then soldered together. A faux finish was applied to the figure in order to mask these soldering joints, and make the material look more expensive. This allowed for segments of the figures to be easily reused, with the ironic result that the figures representing both Northern and Southern soldiers were largely made of the same elements.
    Gives a whole new meaning to galvanized Yankee.
     
  3. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    An insightful observation...
     
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  4. Andersonh1

    Andersonh1 Well-Known Member

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    What does it matter where the monuments were made?
     
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  5. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member

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    So what? Some were made in Europe. So what?
    The Statue of Liberty was made in France.
     
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  6. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Yes, think about it...

    Yes, for one, It seems the leaders of these towns kept it secret form the town folks where the Statues were being made and sent from. Next, the war dead in the ground do you think, they what a monument to them to be made by a Yankee... And last you have Yankee monuments celebrating the confederate dead, its kind of a last finger in the eye of the Confederacy. It could not even make it own monuments for it dead...

    The Yankees made a buck off confederate dead... is that a good thing?

    Yes, it does and it seems it was not debated in the X-confederate towns across America, as it should have been. It was simply brushed un the monuments...
     
  7. Andersonh1

    Andersonh1 Well-Known Member

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    You'll have to spell it out for me, because I'm not seeing the problem.
     
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  8. 5fish

    5fish Well-Known Member

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    Read post #6 a few times and I think it will spell out it out for you... :)
     
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